Rising numbers and costs of data breaches

There is little doubt that the healthcare industry must prepare for a growing number of - and expanding costs associated with - data breaches, particularly for breaches of protected health information.  Here are just a few notable reports on this subject:

  • Infosecurity.com reported on a striking increase in attempts to hack into healthcare organizations, while the rate of hacking in other economic sectors remained flat:  "the last quarter of [2009] saw an average of 13 400 attempts to hack healthcare organizations, compared to an average of 6,500 in the first nine months."  According to researchers at SecureWorks, which produced the graph above, healthcare organizations are particularly vulnerable to such attacks because they "have to provide access to many external networks and web applications so as to stay connected with their patients, employees, insurers and business partners. This increases their risk to cyber attacks."
  • Cnet News reported on similar findings by the Ponemon Institute, whose survey concluded that "Data breaches at U.S. companies attributed to malicious attacks and botnets doubled from 2008 to 2009 and cost substantially more than breaches caused by human negligence or system glitches."  The cost per compromised record involving a criminal act averaged $215, about 40% higher than breaches from negligence and 30% higher than those from glitches, the Ponemon survey found.

 

There are also a couple of examples of individual healthcare organizations suffering from increasing costs associated with data breaches:
 

  • According to Chattanooga Times Free Press (via iHealthBeat), BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee announced that it has spent more than $7 million to respond to a security breach resulting from 57 hard drives having been stolen from its training facility, which may have compromised personal and health data of up to 500,000 members.  $7 million tab does not appear to be the end of it:

The insurer has notified 220,000 BlueCross members about the data theft. The company also is offering no-cost credit-monitoring services for affected members. In addition, BlueCross is working to notify attorneys general in 32 states about the breach [pursuant to the HITECH Act].   <...>

BlueCross officials said 20,500 members already have signed up for the no-cost credit-monitoring services. In addition, the company has hired more than 700 contract and BlueCross employees to help determine what data the hard drives contained. The insurer said it might need to spend significantly more money to evaluate the missing data and provide additional identity protection services.

  • Considering the experience of BCBS of Tennessee, the costs associated with HealthNet's infamous data breach must be even higher. On top of providing two years of free credit-monitoring for hundreds of thousands of affected members, HealthNet is being sued by the state of Connecticut for HIPAA violations and noncompliance with HealthNet's own security policies by failing to encrypt the sensitive data.  The missing hard drive contained "27.7 million scanned pages of more than 120 different types of documents, including insurance claim forms, membership forms, appeals and grievances, correspondence and medical records."  Further complicating HealthNet's situation is the fact that the company waited for six months to inform the affected customers of the possible breach.

"Healthcare hacks on the rise," Inforsecurity.com (January 26, 2010).

"Survey: Data breaches from malicious attacks doubled last year," cnet News (January 25, 2010).

"Tab for Response to Data Breach Hits $7 Million for BCBS of Tennessee," IHealthBeat (January 26, 2010).

"AG files suit in health data privacy breach," theday.com (January 13, 2010).

 

 

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